There used to be a time when I accepted things unquestioningly; the Bible (and Ellen White) say it? It must be true. Simple days. I remember being taught that there was a gap in Orion’s Sword that looked upon heaven; surely even 15 years ago astronomy had already superceded that ‘cloudy gap’ observed a century before by advancements in telescopics, but by golly Joseph Bates and Ellen White said it, it must be so.

If you don’t know what I’m talking about right now, it’s okay. What it comes down to is this: I’ve grown up. I’ve studied conclusions I was taught–and some I wasn’t–and I’ve made my own. I’ve gone from an unquestioning tween with a zealousy to make God so proud He couldn’t possibly overlook me (and perhaps this says something also of my childhood), to a fiery teen with a burning desire to find in a dead religion the source of the glimpses of Spirit I’d seen naturally playing in people not because of the particular sect they were in but because of the people they were. I got frustrated with that one when I went on to become a striving youth eager to put that Spirit back into the religion, not realizing that Spirit doesn’t live in walls made by human hands or precepts. And slowly I became this: a wandering soul. I let the religion, and the walk, slip away. I lost sense of the value of ancient books though I used to study them with a fervent curiosity.

The first time I said, “I’m not a Christian any more,” it felt a little extreme. But the truth is, I don’t think I am–certainly not by the standards of many mainstream Christians. It seemed naked at first, walking around without a label. I spent some time looking around to see if I could pick up a new one somewhere else–Buddhism, anyone? If I were forced to frame myself I would say I am currently a Christ-Taoist–and I would point out that I don’t mean ‘Christ’ as in “Jesus the–“. But I have exhausted my interest in frameworks.

What I wish I could make clear to every Christian I know who is currently praying for either the eventual salvation or swift destruction of such outsiders as myself ‘tossed on the waves of reason,’ as it were, are the simple philosophies of Divinity. Philosophies such as God’s love for man and the utter impossibility of his doing anything less than the utmost (and we’re talking omnipotent here, guys) to bring every single molecule of his creation back to himself. Many would call it heresy to suppose that Christ already accomplished this – I believe It Is Finished.

And getting back to that “not ‘Jesus the–‘” business for a moment, I believe in universal Christ: Christ with all, in all, through all, and all with, in and through Christ. A simple Christian philosophy–but also a simple Buddhist philosophy, and Taoist philosophy, and I believe, a Hindu philosophy–and many others–and in fact more universally shared than Christians like to admit, and why? Because Christians are the only ones who call this ‘Christ’, and so believe they have and hold the One True Thing when the One True Thing was meant for All. Christians. Jews. Muslims. Buddhists. Hindu. Taoists, even. Paul quoted the Greeks when he spoke of Universal Christ saying, ‘in him we live and move and have our being,’ and I’d like to think that Paul wasn’t just appropriating the culture to his own devices but actually recognizing the validity of someone else’s experience of the One True Thing by a Different Name. Read that Again. There is another name for Everything.

There is a principle which comes from Confusionism called wu wei – it literally means inexertion–or inaction. Water follows the principle of wu wei: it flows ever-downward, it flows around things, following the course of least resistance, yielding to whatever stands in its way. And it always will return to the bottom, settling completely. It does this effortlessly, and yet water carved the Grand Canyon. The thing about streams is that they all take different routes, but they all have the same destination: below everything – the foundations of life itself. The water of life was not a meaningless analogy. You yourself are, primarily water, and your own energy responds to the world around you primarily as–you guessed it: water. Wu wei. We’re all destined for the same place. Another name for Everything.

One thought on “In Defense of the Streams

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